Tuesday View: The Front Border 6.13.17

Welcome back!  That’s what I’m saying to myself as I get back to posting Cathy’s weekly view… after an *ahem* three week absence…

street border

This afternoon’s hot and muggy Tuesday view.  The iris are faded, summer has arrived, but the border is looking slightly less than interesting.

There are the usual being busy excuses, the typical computer broke problems, and of course home improvement projects which take on a life of their own, but today I’m more interested in letting you in on a little secret.  For as much as this might shock you, this blog is not as highly trafficked as the witty dialog and artistic photos might indicate.  Posts over the last few weeks have been down, and to be honest there’s not much pressure to post when your daily view count averages in the low 20’s.  As I think on it and ponder the reasons I’m starting to wonder if it’s the raw realness which is turning people off.

fading tulips

Although I’m completely distracted by the second, third, and fourth bloom stalks rising up from my precious red lupine, others might see faded iris stalks, yellowing tulips, overly vigorous weeds, and stray play equipment… I guess in an attempt to mend fences I should apologize for the mess 🙂

Maybe this upcoming week I can pretty things up and polish up on the blog’s readability.  Zinnia seedlings are just a seed packet away and the unusually reliable rains this spring should be very forgiving to late plantings.  In the meantime looking at the far end of the border should cheer someone up.

red hot poker kniphofia

I forgot which red hot poker (kniphofia) this is but I have yet to find one I don’t like.  Sure this one is over in something like two weeks, but I keep holding out hope I’ll find one with a longer season.  The rose is ‘William Baffin’ by the way.

‘William Baffin’ is taking over the end of the border and I’m just fine with that.  No disease problems, absolute hardiness, a nice 6 foot height, and even a little rebloom makes it a decent rose… but stronger fragrance would make it an awesome rose.  I bet all the better blogs have fragrant roses.

William baffin rose

‘William Baffin’ rose, hordes of fennel, and the first blades of the variegated Arundo donax grass coming up and swamping what used to be an iris patch back in May.

Who am I kidding?  Summer is finally here, the grass is a color other than its typical June brown, and there’s always a ton of new things to admire.  Maybe a little less admiring on my part and a little more work, but I’m quite pleased with (most of) the garden and even though I can’t go around the table asking cabinet members to tell me how amazing I am, at least I can look through older posts and hear myself remind myself how amazing I am.

The roses are coming on in the tropical bed as well. Plus three days of heat and humidity have done more for the cannas than three weeks of sitting in the cool dirt. Finally they’re sprouting.

So it’s an optimistic Tuesday view, and as long as I don’t dwell too long on all the other even more excellent blogs out there, I should be able to make it through the week without regretting the $3 a month which “Sorta Suburbia” demands.

Speaking of other more excellent blogs I’d like to mention and thank Cathy at Words and Herbs for her continued support of the Tuesday view.  She and other more excellent bloggers can be found there each week and come Tuesday it’s always a pleasure to see the seasons have progressed another week.  Enjoy!

Rose ‘Livin Easy’

I took full advantage of the cool, generally overcast weather this weekend, and put some solid workdays into the garden.  The deck is cleaned, the pots are planted and the tomatoes are finally planted.  It’s nothing to look at yet, but fortunately this rose is.  It’s ‘Livin Easy’ and although it may not be the newest thing out there and it might not be a color everyone loves, I still think it’s a knockout.

rose livin easy

Oxeye daisies and rose ‘Livin Easy’. Orange isn’t a color everyone loves, but I do.

Some people say it has a fragrance, but it’s not strong enough for my nose.  Even with a lack of fragrance the disease resistant foliage and summer long bloom make up for this fault, and I do nothing other than trim off a few dead branches in the spring and off she goes.  I’m sure fertilizer and more concerned care would do wonders, but I like the way it has become nearly overwhelmed in a sea of daisies.  A real gardener would have probably ripped them out ages ago.