The First day of Spring

I’m sticking to my guns and declaring today the first day of spring.  Non gardeners will spend the next three months whining and complaining about cold weather and chilly winds but some people are only happy when they’re complaining, so good for them.  The sun was out and the temperatures shot up to sweatshirt weather and I did next to nothing all day, just sat around and then sat around some more.  My second coffee probably took an hour to finish and hopefully I didn’t get a sunburn in the process since I was outside for that plus another few hours sitting, wandering, sitting, poking, sitting, uncovering…

galanthus wendys gold

The yellow snowdrops are my favorites.  Here’s ‘Wendy’s Gold’ fully up for the season and pristine after spending a few days under a bucket.

In case you’re wondering how things made it through the frigid cold, they’re fine.  So many things were starting to grow and I had my doubts about all those tender sprouts but only a few things took a hit and the majority look ready to take on the season at full speed.  I’m glad the cold was so short lived, I think that made a huge difference.

galanthus rodmarton

‘Rodmarton’ wasn’t even covered and still looks good.  As far as double snowdrops go I like this one a lot, with green tipped, fat blooms that stand high on sturdy stalks.

So now that spring is here I shall also announce the start of the over-sharing season where this blog fills with a monotony of white and green and sometimes yellow flowers which vary about as much as an island full of golden retrievers.  Hmm.  How’s that for an image?  Shipwrecked sailors would run the risk of being licked to death but would likely lose consciousness first from laughing too much.  But yeah, lots of snowdrops on the way so fair warning.

galanthus sutton courtney

‘Sutton Courtney’ is also up and open.  I love this one as well and she seems to be on the mend again after the gardener stupidly dumped several inches of soil on this bed to raise it some more without replanting the bulbs higher.  Don’t do that.

Maybe winter will return.  Maybe you’ll get a break.  I don’t think so though, so if you’re going to try and stick around just get those standard ‘looks nice’, ‘oh I love them’ comments ready and you won’t even have to read a post since they’re all going to be nearly the same.

At least I’m excited.  Hope you have a great week!

That Was Rough

We are on the fourth day of winter here and there’s even a dusting of snow on the ground to make it look serious.  People were finally zipping up their winter coats and by Friday most of the mountain lakes had ice extending from shore to shore.  Seeing winter weather here was half a relief until I looked at the ten day forecast and saw at least three days next week where the daytime high was over 50F(10C), so calm down.  Don’t pull out the ice fishing equipment just yet.

cold snowdrop

The snowdrops (Galanthus ‘Colossus’) are mostly wilted and flat in the cold.  That’s a good thing actually.

Based on the daily news reports I’m sure everyone was aware that cold weather was headed across much of the US this week.  I’m actually surprised there were no evacuation postings based on the way they were describing it, with dramatic windchill predictions, ‘record-breaking’, ‘life-threatening’ lows and all the dangers associated.  Maybe someone even named the cold front.  Cold front “Karl” is bearing down on the Northeast, buy your milk and bread (minus the egg$) now!!! before the brutal assault begins.

freeze protection spring bulbs

I did manage to bucket a few clumps and then threw fleece over this bed for good measure after ‘Mrs Macnamara’ and ‘Barnes’ flexed their previously damaged foliage and made me feel guilty about neglecting them last time. 

Today when I woke up we were down to -2F (-19C).  That’s about right in line with a normal winter low, even if this winter has been nothing close to normal.  I strolled around a little in the afternoon when the thermometer had risen to around 20F and things might not be too bad.  In spite of how advanced many of the sprouts were, two days of cold prior to the plunge allowed plants to get ready for the blast.  The witch hazel curled up and the snowdrops went limp.  Limp, sugar concentrated snowdrops don’t freeze as well and the wilted foliage doesn’t burst as easily from expanding ice crystals.  Tomorrow when spring arrives we will see what bounces back.  Hopefully most everything will since the coldest weather was just one night and things were somewhat ready for it.  Nature can be smart, probably smarter than an idiot teen who needs to be told to go back into the house and put on a coat before this car is going anywhere for goodness sakes it’s not even 8 degrees out…

freeze protection spring bulbs

It was so nice and sunny (yet cold) Thursday after work that I did go a little overboard with the freeze protection.  Cut evergreen boughs, buckets and fleece were doled out for the most precious and precocious of the snowdrops.

I really can’t blame the teen entirely.  His father is the one who planted all these European and Asian snowdrops and witch hazels, and thought a winter garden would be a good idea in a climate which welcomes brutal winters.  He’s not exactly the brightest either but let’s not dwell on that right now.

freeze protection spring bulbs

Even the regular golden winter aconites(Eranthis hiemalis) are thumbing their noses at this winter.  In another week they’ll be sprouting up everywhere with an enthusiasm better suited to March.

So in another moment of brightness I’m declaring the winter of ’22-’23 to be over.  February and March can be cold here but I’m giving up on winter, and next week everything is being uncovered and I’m starting the official spring cleanups regardless of historical averages.  I should be disturbed and cautious but that’s our world these days and I’m saying it’s time to plan for snowdrop season and make a few calls for this spring’s snowdropping adventures.  Giddyap I say and plan on making the best of the warmth!

Spring in January

Saturday was awesome.  Nearly 50F (10C) and sunny, with just a touch of wind kicking up in the afternoon, it was the kind of weather which might be a touch warm for an Irishman but for me it was a perfect spring day… in winter of course.  We are still in a weather pattern which has been luring more and more plants out of the ground and into harm’s way, and things could come crashing down any minute.  Actually that minute might be this Friday night when a front is threatening to knock lows down to about zero (-17C) so we will see.

pale yellow eranthis

The warmth and sun have coaxed the pale yellow winter aconite (Eranthis hiemalis) into full bloom.  These flowers will melt in the cold, but the plants should survive to try again in spring 2024…

Oh my gosh I have so much random babbling to get out of my system that I barely know where to start.  Perhaps complaining about a lack of blog views is a perfect place to begin since I’m already on to the woe is me, the weather is getting cold for two days, pity party.  2022 ended and my stats are the lowest numbers since 2014.  Rough calculations on my part show that in that same period of time the global population has grown by 253 million, so as you can see it’s even worse than you would think since even a quarter billion supposedly tech-savy babies can’t be bothered to visit my blog.  Shall I change my business model or content?  Maybe branch out into alternate platforms and super-connect with social media?  Heh heh, you know me better than that, obviously continued laziness will be my answer, and you can expect few to none on those new tricks on the horizon.

galanthus bess richard ayres

Galanthus ‘Bess’, with ‘Richard Ayres’ behind will suffer melted blooms in near zero cold, ‘Bess’ will probably be the worst just as she was two years ago from another freeze but maybe the lazy head gardener can cover a few things to help them along.

I happened to notice my visitor stats when I received notification that 2023 will be my ten year anniversary at Sorta Like Suburbia.  You can take my word that a ten year anniversary on a blog which I don’t think I started that long ago did not help me feel any younger for a recent birthday celebration.  Also not helping were reminders that in another year I will be eligible for senior discounts at most of the local restaurants.

galanthus castle plum

Galanthus ‘Castle Plum’ is so perfect today, and one of my favorites for an early snowdrop.  Still only one bulb after several years but who am I to pressure him to start having babies?  

Obviously this gardener is not the type who gets bubbly and excited for his birthday, just in case you didn’t notice.  My thrill was that the weather was beautiful and my celebration was being able to finish cleaning out enough of the front street border so that the earliest flowers can come up through something other than dead twigs and windblown trash.  It might be early.  It might be too early, but things are coming up anyway and if I wait longer my clumsy footsteps will do more damage to the plants than this and other likely-to-still-come hard freezes.

hellebore buds

This hellebore (unlike others in the garden) doesn’t usually suffer from extreme cold snaps.  I’ll let you know how it makes it through this one.

By the way, I also noticed that my earliest posts from the golden days of this blog were much shorter and far wittier.  Maybe I should at least make an effort to keep this short.

pale yellow eranthis

More pale eranthis (only pale ones since the normal dark yellows are still waiting for warmer days).  Some of these snowdrops might make it, but they’ve also lost flowers in freezes in years past.

…and more helpful.  Posts about how things should be grown and what you shouldn’t do (I’m very good at that!) might be something to reconsider rather than endless whining about how we are finally going to have two cold nights this winter.

galanthus mrs Macnamara

‘Mrs Macnamara’ rarely makes it through a winter here without a beating from the cold.  Last winter was so rough on her she’s actually blooming a bit sparsely this year, and if she wasn’t such a good grower I’d have sent her to a more Southern garden years ago.

So here’s my tip for sudden freezes while your plants are already in growth.  Buy a greenhouse.  Fill it with hardy things like snowdrops and cyclamen so that a broken heater isn’t the end of the world and it might be a fantastic diversion for when the arctic visits.  It will be a great place for ‘Mrs Macnamara’ and she deserves it, doesn’t she?

galanthus daphnes scissors

‘Daphne’s Scissors’ will probably not appreciate the cold but might also be just fine.  When I was reviewing this photo I noticed the vertebrae of some poor little creature’s spine at the base of the clump.  I guess the garden is always an up and down, life or death kind of place.  

So I don’t know how we ended up on the topic of greenhouses.  Hmmm.  More economical advice will be to invert an empty pot or bucket over these tender shoots and maybe that will help with icy winds or possibly to catch a few degrees of protection.  It will be worth it and I’m already preparing a scolding for myself for not bothering.

The Turning of the Tides

I had a nice surprise Tuesday morning on the way to work.  The normally dark and gloomy ride was brightened up by something I haven’t seen in a while, a sunrise.  To call it a sunrise is giving the event a bunch more credit than it deserves, but it was a pinkish glow spread across the edges of a smattering of clouds and was much nicer than the black abyss I’ve gotten used to over the last few weeks.  It’s a hopeful moment.  There will still be plenty a day before I can walk into work with an actual sun over the horizon, but until then a promising glow in the morning counts for a lot.

hammamelis pallida

With or without morning sun, the first of the witch hazels (Hammamelis x ‘Pallida’) has opened up for a full-bloom show of color in the otherwise bleak landscape.

The promise of seeing daylight again on the ride to work is a nice affirmation that days really are getting longer and spring will someday be more than an idea.  Nice isn’t always good though, since this week typically brings the very coldest days of the season, and getting all sentimental and hopeful weeks too early can be torture when a string of snowstorms rolls through from February to March.  Actually it can get expensive as well.  People get delusional about expanding vegetable gardens and starting viburnum collections and planting new cannas everywhere.  People can also get judgmental toward delusional gardeners, and let me state clearly here that that’s not ok.  You should never be judgmental about people just trying to make the world a better place, and that’s exactly what a February gardener is trying to do with their not-as-well-planned-as-they-could-be new plant decisions.

hammamelis spanish spider

First blooms on a new little witch hazel.  ‘Spanish Spider’ was a totally unplanned and perhaps unnecessary purchase which is proving itself invaluable and essential this week.

For now on I will consider midwinter purchases as brilliant, perhaps genius, foresight.  Leave the bean-counting to accountants and go ahead and buy as many bean seeds as you think your ‘Year of the Bean’ needs.  Tell the naysayers they’re the type who would drive unrecognized genius to cut off an ear, and unless they want to be part of the problem they should instead help choose a nice yellow Romano pole bean to go with the heirloom purple.

pale yellow eranthis

More pale yellow Eranthis hiemalis are hearing the call of spring…. or maybe winter… they are also called winter aconites after all.

So enough with the aimless babbling and back to the garden.  We’re still running a good bit above average temperatures.  Skiing is happening but the ice fishermen are still on the sidelines, and plants are still trying to start growing just a little too early.

peony shoots

Peony shoots always seem to come up too early.  These Peonia daurica buds look awfully exposed but they’re really quite hardy.  At least that’s one thing I won’t have to worry about.

Fingers crossed that the early sprouts mean an early spring, and not a disaster of melted and blackened tender foliage in a month or two’s time.  A few things are still reeling from December’s blast.

freeze damage snowdrop

The fall blooming snowdrops (G. elwesii ‘Barnes’ in this case) did not appreciate going from North Carolina to Newfoundland in 12 hours.  I see new growth though, so I suspect all is not lost.

freeze damaged sternbergia lutea

A Sternbergia lutea (autumn daffodil?) which might be worse than it looks.  All the browned damage is right close to the bulb and the rest of the leaf might follow as the damage works its way down.

freeze damaged sternbergia lutea

Another Sternbergia lutea just a few inches away, further out into the garden which should have been more exposed and therefore damaged, but no, it looks untouched.  The narrower foliage could mean something, and it’s also from a different source.  Maybe it’s just variations in the species, but who knows?  

freeze damaged cyclamen coum

Some of the hardy cyclamen (C. hederifolium and C. coum) were blasted by the cold, but I know they’ll recover, and by the looks of these early buds there’s still a good chance for an excellent spring flowering.

Obviously I can’t leave off on a gardening report with a down note on snowdrops.  They’re inching forward, and hopefully still pace themselves in spite of the continuous above average temperatures.

early snowdrops galanthus ophelia

The double ‘Ophelia’ is moving right along and should make a great show in a few more weeks.  Unlike some, I don’t think she’s ever been bothered by a later freeze.

A few snowdrops are always eager to get started.  Some years it’s cold enough to hold them back to bloom alongside the later varieties, other years they pop up early, hopefully miss the worst weather, and the season is extended that many more weeks:)

galanthus wendys gold

‘Wendy’s Gold’ will bloom during the next nice day, I suspect Sunday or Monday… right before the possibility of two actual winter days… maybe… 

So snowdrops are still good just in case you were worried, and by the way the winter garden is also still good even if winter hasn’t been as healthy as he should be.

Another year of seed cleaning and sorting is finished and now my little coffee table is all tidied up and set for the main round of seed sowing.

It’s all the usual suspects under the lights, plus a few pots of daylily seedlings for the farm. If all goes well this will become a deliciously overgrown mess again by May.

There’s always a few new things. Someone gave me a bromeliad (Neoregelia) last summer and after a billion hours of online bromeliad searching I can proudly say I still only have one and I also haven’t moved to the tropics to grow them better. Go me!

I wish I could say the same for succulents. Who knew 20 bucks on Etsy could get you a tiny box of 10 mixed Echeveria agavoides cuttings!!?? 20 more bucks can get a handful of lithop seedlings to show up at your doorstep!!

So not to brag, I think I’m handling the depths of winter quite well.  Witch hazels on the way, snowdrops in bloom, and exciting things under the grow lights.  I could get used to these non-winters… assuming the two days of cold next week don’t become a habit… but even if they do there’s still always those longer days, the stronger sun, and there’s only so much winter can do against that.

Have a great weekend!

 

Into the New Year

It’s been a bit chilly this weekend, and this morning’s low of 21F (-6C) is about as close to normal as we’ve come this month.  A January thaw isn’t all that unusual for the region, but having the entire month with each and every day at above average temperatures is.  Next weekend the longer range forecast has Friday night going one degree below average, but that might be our only chance for the month.  I was raking last Sunday rather than skiing, and that level of productivity on a day of rest is far less my style than bumming around on a ski lift.

hamamelis pallida

The first of the Asian witch hazels are opening, with Hamamelis x ‘Pallida’ in the lead.  

On the plus side I was able to spread a compost mulch over the last neglected snowdrop bed and start trimming hellebores.  Things are starting to sprout and I’ll take the warm weather as one last chance to finish last autumn’s cleanup and freshen things up for the approaching snowdrop season.  According to my far-less-than-scientific records, this winter has echoes of 2021, which barely tried to get cold until the end of January, and then sat us in snow and cold until March… which sounds complainy but was actually perfect for holding everything back until it could sprout more sensibly.  2021 might have been my best snowdrop season so I apologize if it sounds like I’m wishing for cold to come just so things here develop well 😉

hellebore buds

This double red hellebore is always eager to sprout, and maybe I can trim off the old foliage this afternoon.  The autumn leaves are staying though, I’ve reached the point where nearly every leaf which falls in the garden remains in situ.  

Even if arctic cold never develops (beyond that little try at an ice age in December) I’m 98% sure this winter and spring will be amazing.  I have buds showing on new snowdrops and color developing on new witch hazels and dreams of an astounding 2023.  The only roadblock I see is catalog browsing, which has been a tad addictive the last few weeks.  I blame the long nights and too cold to do anything/ not cold enough to do other things weather, plus some delusion that I need to order obscure bulbs and shrubs which will haunt me all summer waiting to be planted.  The last few years have been fairly restrained as far as buying new plants so maybe I deserve something?  But no!  That kind of thinking is so dangerous during the post-Holiday season when I’m dealing with cookie withdrawal.

galanthus faringdon double

Unlike many of the other early snowdrops, Galanthus ‘Faringdon Double’ lucked out with the December cold, and appears to have settled in well for her second year here.  

I’ll have to retire to the winter garden and do some repotting and watering to get my mind off hardy crinums and early blooming viburnums.  There’s plenty to do in there with budding amaryllis and flowering cyclamen and cuttings which need more room.  I have to see where I’m going with things this year since a casual count of pots is already close to 200 and I haven’t even seriously begun in there.  Oops.

pale yellow eranthis hiemalis moonlight

The first winter aconite.  A pale yellow sort of Eranthis hiemalis which always blooms a few weeks earlier than her brothers.  If the weather stays mild they’re fantastic, if the weather turns harsh they freezer burn.

Actually I should go work on the closet organizers.  That’s honest work which makes me look productive even if I’m about as excited about carpentry as I am for doing my taxes, but at least it’s more rewarding and it keeps me out of the garden (mostly).  Perhaps I need more stain and a run to the box store is in order, and as a reward someone gets to look over their succulent selections for a little carpenter’s treat to take home along with the stain purchase.  Hmmm.  That would be the fourth ‘carpenter’s treat’ this month, and obviously not helping the pot count.

Have a great week and obviously a 4$ succulent on a stain run doesn’t count as a plant purchase and is still a better choice than a 6$ coffee or ice cream… not that I’m really ruling out the icecream…

Solstice ’22

The longest night of the year approaches and in theory it’s an easy ride from here to longer days and warmer temps… in theory at least.  From here on the days get longer, the sun gets stronger, but at this latitude it will still take a while for the thermometer to gain traction and the slide into the depths of winter to slow down and reverse.  That’s fine I guess.  Snow has arrived and it’s kind of soothing to have all the undone garden tasks tucked away and forgotten… for a few weeks at least 😉

fall elwesii snowdop

The fall snowdrop parade continues with these G.elwesii ssp monostictus from Montrose Gardens.  It’s been just warm enough to bring them on to perfection, even after the insult of a couple inches of snow on top.

Honestly I should think about protecting a few more tender things, such as the autumn snowdrops, from the cold which approaches.  Friday is forecast to start with pouring rain, thunderstorms and a high of 51F(11C), and then tumble down into snow squalls and a low of 8F(-13C) by the evening.  Exposed snowdrop flowers shall be freezer burnt.  Should be fun.  I’m sure gardeners, skiers, and white Christmasers alike are all wishing it were purely snow instead, and only municipal pencil pushers (and maybe a couple million holiday travelers) are happy for the warm start to the storm, but you get what you get.

longwood christmas 22

Christmas displays in the Longwood Gardens conservatory.  Friday presented itself as a snow-day so we braved a few miles of icy roads here in the mountains to escape South to balmy Philadelphia for the day.   

In either case Wednesday will be the longest night of the year, and I hope it finds you snug and cozy and ready for the holiday season.  It’s nice to have this break.  It leaves you with plenty of time to enjoy your winter garden, order NARGs seed exchange seeds which you don’t need, and inventory new snowdrops and map all their bed locations.  It’s going to be a busy winter 😉

A Week of Flowers-Day 7

Congratulations to Cathy on another successful Week of Flowers, and all the flowery joy which her and other bloggers have brought to computer screens across the world!  I’ve enjoyed the adventure and as expected will wrap things up with one last flowery bulb.

Colchicums!

growing colchicum

During the late days of summer and throughout fall, colchicums(autumn crocus if you’d like, but they’re 100% not crocus relatives) bring color to the fading garden.  Depending on your frame of mind they’re either the perfect end to the bulb season, or the first heralds of the new growth of fall and winter.

I’ve posted plenty on colchicums in the past, so won’t bore you with too many details, but these bulbs will sprout their hosta-like foliage in the spring, die back for the summer, and then erupt with fresh flowers in the fall just when everything else was starting to look tired.

growing colchicum

Colchicums popping up through a groundcover of leadwort.

growing colchicum

Even out of bone-dry, late-summer tired soil, colchicums still manage to wake up and look fresh as if everything for the new season will be perfect.

growing colchicum

Colors range is white or pinks with single or double flowers.  The whites can be really nice although here in my gray planting it might still need some developing.

And that wraps up Cathy’s Week of Flowers. I hope your early December days were brightened by the color, and your long nights refreshed with dreams of flowers past… a good type of refreshing, not a Dickenesque haunting by the ghosts of seasons past… and if you still need some more refreshing, consider it’s just two weeks until the winter solstice and lengthening days strengthening rays and then it starts all over again!

Enjoy your break while it lasts 😉

A Week of Flowers-Day 6

The week of flowers continues and I think I’ve stumbled across one of those revelations which probably everyone else already knew, but when it’s about yourself you’re always the last to know.  My revelation is that I’m a little bulb obsessed.  Any bulb or corm or tuber seems just a bit more special than your average bunch of roots or twigs…. or quite possibly it’s just whatever I’m thinking about that week… and this week it’s bulbs.  Whatever.  Better to not think too long on things like this since the last time it happened I decided I needed to bring more ‘other’ bulbs into my life, as in adding more Lycoris to the garden.  It’s been a painfully slow process waiting for them to get settled in, watching them sulk, wondering if I can blame anyone other than myself for torturing these poor little things, and then one flower comes up and I’m on the computer for hours looking for more info to distract myself with.

lycoris x squamigera

Lycoris x squamigera, the hardy magic lilies which thrive in most gardens but not so much here until recently…

Most of the magic lilies aka spider lilies aka hurricane lilies aka nakid ladies are not quite hardy enough for this garden, but several are, and they’re usually the type of flower which sets its roots down, blooms with abandon, and then outlives the gardener and homestead… unless they’re here of course.  Here they’ve limped along for years until just recently when they decided to humor me with a few exquisite blooms.

lycoris x houdyshelii

Opening pale yellow, and then fading to a strawberry blush, Lycoris x houdyshelii is a borderline hardy cross which finally sent a single bloom up this summer.  I hope I don’t have to wait another three years for the next bloom.

Maybe someday I can report back on the secrets to success with these, but today I think it’s better to just enjoy the flowers and reflect back on the cozy hot and humid summer days of their season.

lycoris x incarnata

The peppermint surprise lily (Lycoris x incarnata) is supposed one of the easiest and best growers, and last summer mine acted as such… it just took four years for it to figure that out!

lycoris radiata

In the South, I’ve been told red spider lilies(Lycoris radiata) grow like weeds.  Here in the North their winter foliage can cause problems, but last winter’s mild stretches seemed to make at least one bulb happy.  Sadly my other two bulbs decided to rot from all the melting snow runoff, so a 33% success rate is terrible yet it’s also good enough a success rate to fire up my delusions for another few years.

lycoris x caldwellii

I have high hopes for Lycoris x caldwellii which has been growing in the garden somewhat vigorously for years but only flowered for the first time this summer. I think my plantings need more sun.

So that’s a lot of complaining for day 6, and I apologize, but hopefully the pictures have brought on a few thoughts of your own late-summer flowers, pool-time, and cricket-filled evenings and that’s always a good thing.  Another good thing is a visit to Cathy’s Week of Flowers on Words and Herbs and all the additional flowers you’ll see there.

Have a great week!

A Week of Flowers-Day 5

I’m taking it easy on day five of Cathy’s Week of Flowers celebration.  I guess I don’t party like I used to.  Today with a single photo I’m celebrating the heat of late July and the entire month of August, and the hot red flowers of Lobelia cardinalis.  This moisture loving North American native plant finally settled in just off the back porch in a somewhat shaded and often damp corner of the house.  While the cardinal flowers are in bloom, hummingbirds run a near constant turf war with guards and hit and runs and and the constant chatter of chases and aerial combat.  A gardener who sits nearby to enjoy the shelter and shade is guaranteed a face-to-face barrage of insults from some tiny hovering pint-sized fighter pilot.  Hummingbirds seem so tiny and cute, but in reality they’re little flying honey badgers.

lobelia cardinalis

Cardinal flower filling the end of the shade garden.

Hope you are enjoying your weekend, it’s a beautifully sunny morning here and although it’s also on the cold side, the rest of the week looks tolerable… and by tolerable I mean good shipping weather for a little box of succulents…

Merry Christmas to me!

A Week of Flowers-Day 4

My pink waterlily probably has a name, but having never expected much from her I didn’t pay much mind to the label.  She was plunked down in a somewhat shady hole with a plastic liner and no filter, and I thought that as long as there were lily pads for the frogs it was a win.  That describes the first year or two, but then construction hit the garden and the ‘pond’ became a catch basin of debris and runoff and overflow trash which is apparently more important to a waterlily than space or sun or fertilizer.  Last summer was a nonstop succession of flowers with as many as four open at a time, and although it is likely the first and last year for this to happen I thoroughly enjoyed it.

pink waterlily

The pink waterlily.  A plump little piglet in her murky swamp of a pond.

Four straight days of posts.  I’m proud of myself and hopefully it’s been somewhat entertaining for you as well.  I’d also like to apologize for my slacking on the comments.  There’s no excuse other than laziness and a love for an early bedtime but I do appreciate it and hopefully someday soon I’ll catch up!

Thanks again to my inspirational host, Cathy of Words and Herbs, and I hope you can check out her’s and other’s posts celebrating Cathy’s Week of Flowers.